Unidirectional Decisions

I worked in IT support when I was in college.  In that department, you were either an Apple Fanboy or you were wrong.  So my decision to empty my account of surplus loan funds and purchase a MacBook Pro worth more than the car I drove was a foregone conclusion.  And I’m glad I did because it helps me illustrate my point: There are unidirectional decisions in life.  For example, the number of people who have gone from PC to Mac is far larger than the number of those who have gone from Mac to PC.

After reading the first few chapters of “The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari,” I noticed a similar decision.  I’ve heard a lot of stories about powerful executives, high-powered lawyers, and stressed-out CFOs leaving their career and simplifying their life somehow.  Maybe they’ll become a monk, an organic farmer, or a freelance consultant.  Maybe they’ll retire early instead of waiting until after the inevitable heart attack.  Maybe they’ll find whatever it is they’re still looking for.

But I haven’t heard about any of the satisfied, enlightened, creative individuals waking up with the sunrise and declaring “That’s what missing from my life, a partnership at a leading firm.”  And then they sell their yurt, get three part-time jobs, and start climbing up the ladder.  That never happens.  They know they’ve already figured it out.

Advertisements
Unidirectional Decisions