Blogging Provides a Service

I read an article in the Washington Post Magazine yesterday about socialite blogger Kate Michael.  She works a regular job of some sort and then attends several social gatherings in DC every night.  She takes pictures, talks with people, and then publishes a post to her K Street Kate site.  While my t-shirts and old shoes are not likely to get me confused with a DC socialite, I learned a few things from the article.  Kate said that she doesn’t carry a notebook with her because “if [she doesn’t] remember it, it’s not worth telling other people about it.”  Which is interesting, and I might try to think that way as well.

Most of all though, I saw that her work provides a service to the DC community.  Her team goes to every event worth going to, takes pictures, and gets invited to the next one.  Personally, I’m not all that interested in what the hip young people are doing at night in the city, but I understand that many people do care.  

I’ve heard that to make it as a blogger, writer, anyone-relevant-online, you have to share your passion and expertise.  This is where I hit a wall.  I’m not passionate about much, except whatever interesting thing I see online that day.  And while I have some moderate expertise, it isn’t focused or substantial enough to merit a concentrated effort.  The article said that Kate gets around 500 views on her site each day, which isn’t a huge number, but obviously far more than my 2-3 views per day, and enough to get an article written about her.  Of course she has been doing this for many years and has a whole team of journalist-bloggers working on the site.  Seems that I have a long way to go, but I guess we’ll just take it one day at a time looking for that passion and expertise.  Because as thrilling as my ongoing life story is, I’m not convinced that I’m really contributing much to the world at large.

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Blogging Provides a Service